The Different Types of Skiing Terrain

The Different Types of Skiing Terrain

Going skiing sounds a simple enough phrase for a favorite activity by many skiers. But are you aware that there are many types of downhill skiing and being asked to go skiing by one group of skiers might mean something totally different to another set. In this blog we will try and demystify the jargon and explain the terminology of the different types of downhill skiing that there is.

Downhill Skiing

The normal way most of us ski is simple downhill skiing, on marked courses that have been graded in difficulty by color. You take a lift up to the start then push off and follow the course.

Freeriding

Freeriding is when you venture off the marked trails, normally not too far from the sides of the slope. Many free riders are attracted by trees and bowls of unspoiled snow. The types of skis used in this type of skiing are normally wider than standard, this is so they do not sink in powder. Some countries refer to freeriding as backcountry skiing, which is a way of explaining that it is away from the marked slopes.

Off-Piste

Off-Piste is a commonly used term for somebody that has decided to stray away from the central point. It is exactly the same in skiing, off-piste means that you are no longer on the marked trail and skiing on advanced terrain that is not maintained.

Tree Skiing

Tree Skiing

For advanced skiers only, the popularity of tree-skiing has always been high as it gives the opportunity to find undisturbed glades and the chance to ski in and out of the trees. The benefits of this type of skiing is that powder snow often gathers around the trees and can be fun to ski on.

 

Mogul Skiing

Mogul Skiing

Moguls are simply big mounds of snow, sometimes they are created by the number of skiers turning on a run, other times they a deliberately built to provide entertainment. Trying to navigate through and over the moguls has become so popular that there are now competitions. Skiers have to maneuver through the bumps come to a large ramp, turn then make their way back. The fastest time wins the competition. Skiers have to maneuver through the bumps come to a large ramp, turn then make their way back. The fastest time wins the competition.

Terrain Park Skiing

A terrain park is a falsely created area that are specifically designed for performing snow tricks. Some of the features that a terrain park may have are, halfpipes, quarter pipes, fun boxes, big jumps and rail slides. Think of them in terms of a skateboarder paradise and you will not be too far off the mark.

Powder Skiing

One of the best surfaces to ski on is a fresh blanked of powder snow, it is what most skiers adore and seek out. Powder tests the skill as it is so soft and many skiers do not get the opportunity to ever ski on it. It is very different to normal skiing as the key to it is to stay on top of the snow and not to sink. This is mostly achieved by moving fast over the surface and not to dig the skis in too much for turns etc. Once mastered it is a fantastic feeling as you will be almost gliding as you ski.