Olympic Skiing Disciplines – Part 2

Olympic Skiing Disciplines – Part 2

The FIS or Federation de Ski was founded back in 1924 which coincided with the first Winter Olympic Games in Chamonix the same year. The Federation is responsible and the governing body for the Olympic disciplines of Alpine skiing, ski jumping, Nordic combined, cross-country skiing, freestyle skiing, and snowboarding. Of course, snowboarding and freestyle are relatively new additions to the six disciplines but the other four are rich in sporting history. In this blog we take a look at each of the six disciplines and explain a little more about them.

Alpine – Downhill & Super G

Probably the granddaddy and most elite of the six disciplines in the Alpine, which in itself consists of ten events split equally among the sexes. The longest course of all the skiing events is the downhill, and because of this it is also the fastest. The racing car sounding Super G simply means Giant Slalom and it is a combination of the speed of downhill racing which also includes tighter turns. In both of these events it is the fastest time of a single run that determines the winner.

Alpine – Slalom & Super Combined

The slalom is everybody’s favorite as it is the shortest course but has the tightest bends and fastest curves. The Giant Slalom is a bit less hectic and is longer with smoother turns for the skiers to navigate. The competition entails each skier to make two runs, on different courses but still on the same slope. Each run is calculated and the times combined, the skier with the lowest combined score wins. In the Super Combined, they use one downhill but the other is swapped with the slalom, again the combined lowest time wins the event.

Alpine – Slalom

Cross Country

The Cross-Country discipline is again split into twelve different events, for the ladies there is the sprint, the team sprint, the relay, the pursuit and the rather hectic mass start. The men have the same events but some of the courses are longer than their female colleagues. Cross Country skiing is very much like Cross Country running in that the competitors have to tackle a wide variety of terrain that uses a complete envelope of skills.

Ski Jumping

A male only event, Ski jumping has three events. Two of the events are competed by individual skiers which are the normal hill jump and the large hill jump. Then there is a third event which is team based on the larger hill. While competing individually the skiers jump twice and each jump is measured for length, the combined two longest lengths from one athlete wins. In the team event each team has four skiers, and the combined four jumps in terms of length is their score. After the first jump the top eight teams go to battle it out for the gold. Ski jumping completes the first part of our blog on the different types of disciplines in Olympic skiing, in part two we look at Nordic Combined, Snowboarding and Freestyle.  Two of the disciplines are relatively new to Olympic competition but have found a place in the winter sport that attracts so many competitors and audiences.     

Ski Jumping